Charles Edward Jeanneret

Charles Edward Jeanneret was born on 09 Feb 1834 in New South Wales, or Hobart Australia. He died on 23 Aug 1898 in Wyrallah, Richmond River, New South Wales, Australia. He married Julia Anne Bellingham, daughter of Francis Bellingham and Julia Rowe Ive on 12 Jun 1857 in St Phillips Church, Sydney NSW. She was born on 14 Jun 1837 in Gracechurch, London, England. She died in 1919 in Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia.

 

Charles and Julia Anne had the following children:

 

i. Henry Stanley Jeanneret was born on 07 Apr 1858 in ‘Henly Cottage’, Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He died in 1911 in Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He married Mary Elizabeth Banks Smith on 12 Apr 1890 in St George’s Church, Hobart, Tasmania. She died on 31 Dec 1936.

ii. Lucy Warren Jeanneret was born on 24 Mar 1860 in ‘Henly Cottage’, Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. She died on 20 Aug 1891 in Dungog, New South Wales, Australia. She married Harry Seymour Bingle, son of John Rayden Bingle and Frances Elizabeth Corlette in 1889. He was born in 1865 in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. He died in 1931 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

iii. Ida Jane Jeanneret was born on 17 Jul 1862 in ‘Fernbank’, Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. She died in 1946 in Concord, Canada Bay, New South Wales, Australia. She married Charles Frederick Moore Michelmore, son of John

Mitchelmore and Harriet Hoskings in 1888 in Ryde, New South Wales. He was born on 09 Mar 1863 in Totnes, Devon, England. He died in 1917 in Drummoyne, Canada Bay, New South Wales, Australia.

iv. Francis edward Jeanneret was born on 28 Sep 1863 in Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He died on 06 Dec 1933 in Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He married Augusta Bassett Hull, daughter of Hugh Munro Hull and Margaret Bassett Tremlett on 17 Apr 1888 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. She was born on 15 Aug 1864 in

“Tolosa”, Tolosa Street, Glenorchy, Tasmania. She died on 16 Oct 1933 in Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia.

v. Charles Frederick Jeanneret was born on 29 Nov 1865 in Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He died in 1932 in Balmain, New South Wales, Australia. He married Rozalie de l'Argue in 1903. She died in 1942.

vi. Alfred Ernest Campbell Jeanneret was born on 26 Feb 1868 in Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He died on 11 Sep 1944 in Cooma, New South Wales, Australia. He married Amy May Rose, daughter of Reuben Uther Bartlett Rose and Eliza Jane Merrett in 1908. She was born on 08 Feb 1878 in Boloco, Dalgety, New South Wales, Australia. She died on 18 Feb 1955 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

vii. Arthur John Jeanneret was born on 20 Feb 1870 in ‘Summerville’, Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He died on 24 Mar 1939 in Tweed Heads, New South Wales, Australia.

viii. Herbert Jeanneret was born on 29 Apr 1872 in ‘Summerville’, Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He died on 03 Aug 1932 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. He married Fanny Ridge Henson, daughter of George Robson Henson and Mary Ann Ridge in 1902 in Lismore, New South Wales, Australia. She was born in 1879 in St George, New South Wales, Australia. She died in 1962 in Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia.

ix. Charles Louis Jeanneret was born on 20 May 1874 in ‘Summerville’, Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He died on 05 Aug 1923 in Balmain, New South Wales, Australia. He married Stella Henson, daughter of George Robson Henson and Mary Ann Ridge in 1902 in Lismore, New South Wales, Australia. She was born in 1875 in Windsor, New South Wales, Australia. She died in 1964 in St.Leonards, New South Wales, Australia.

x. Edwin Sinclair Jeanneret was born on 14 May 1876 in ‘Wybalena’, Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. He died on 14 Sep 1944 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. He married Maybelle Olive Henson, daughter of George Robson Henson and Mary Ann Ridge on 18 Aug 1924 in St Phillips Church, Sydney. She was born in 1891 in Burwood, New South Wales, Australia. She died on 14 Sep 1944.

xi. FlorencE Annie Jeanneret was born on 21 Nov 1878 in ‘Wybalena’, Hunters Hill, New South Wales, Australia. She died in Nov 1942 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. She married Ethelbert Christian Hull, son of Hugh Munro Hull and Margaret Bassett Tremlett in 1906 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. He was born on 27 Aug 1870 in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. He died in 1949 in Ryde, New South Wales, Australia.

Charles Edward Jeanneret and family

ONE of the successful among the native-born of New South Wales, which takes us back to the period in our history before the introduction of free institutions, is that of Mr. Jeanneret, a well-known resident of the picturesque suburb of Hunter’s Hill, with the development and progress of which he has always been closely identified. As a public spirited and enterprising citizen, and Alderman both of his own suburb and of the City Council, and later as a member of the Legislative Assembly, he is in many worthy respects an acknowledged representative man.

 

Charles Edward Jeanneret was born in Sydney in 1834, during the term of rule of Governor Sir Richard Bourke, K.C.B. His father, of whom our subject is the only surviving son, was Dr. Henry Jeanneret, an old and respectable colonist of New South Wales, and subsequently Civil Commandant of Flinders Land, a dependency of Tasmania. Here the son spent most of his boyhood and youth, and acquired that love of the sea and acquaintance with the¬ principles of navigation and practical seamanship, which led him to undertake a voyage to Europe at the age of eighteen. On returning to Australia the attractions of the diggings proved stronger than his nautical proclivities, however, and he followed the Bendigo gold rush to where the city of Sandhurst now is, and remained there for three years. Subsequently he returned to Sydney, and, after a period of service in the Bank of New South Wales, he entered into a general agency partnership with a Mr. Henry Porter. He married about the same time, and settled at Hunter’s Hill.

 

It may be here remarked that this beautiful suburb was first inhabited bv Mr. Muir, one of the historic “Scotch Martyrs”, transported to this colony for his efforts to obtain certain popular parliamentary reforms which have long since passed into law. Mr. Muir was a gentleman of education and position, and a barrister, but a packed jury and an intolerant Government secured his conviction in the face both of justice and of law. His case aroused world-wide sympathy. General Washington sent a ship to rescue him. He escaped, but the ship was wrecked. After a weary land journey of many thousand miles he again took ship, but the vessel was attacked by a British cruiser. and in the conflict Mr. Muir was dangerously wounded. A bible in his possession bore his name on the fly-leaf, and one of the British officers recognised the wounded man as an old friend. Muir subsequently escaped to Paris, where the Directory gave him a friendly greeting. On rising to respond at a banquet given by five hundred French gentlemen in his honour, he was overcome, fell back, and expired. A public funeral was accorded his remains, as those of a martyr to the cause of popular liberty, by the French Government. Mr. Muir first named Hunter’s Hill.

 

On Mr. Jeanneret’s settling there it presented a very dissimilar appearance to that of to-day. By prudent land investments Mr. Jeanneret prospered apace, and became a shareholder and manager of a local steam company. For some years a keen competition went on between that and a rival enterprise, but eventually the two coalesced and later on both were sold, with fleet and goodwill, to Mr. Jeanneret. This occurred in 1876, and at that time there were but five steamers to meet the river trade. This number Mr. Jeanneret has since increased to upwards of twenty. Farming, mining, meat-preserving, and other industries occupied the residue of his time, and the traces of his building enterprise are visible all along the Lane Cove and the Parramatta Rivers. Another of his works, and by no means the least enterprising or progressive, is the tramway from the head of the Parramatta River to the Park, the Rose Hill Racecourse, and the town of Parramatta.

 

In municipal matters his activity has been quite marked. The incorporation of Hunter’s Hill is directly due to his energetic advocacy and personal exertions. Since 1871, when that event took place, Mr. Jeanneret has been an Alderman and for some years Mayor of that borough. In recent years he has been elected to the City Council, where he has distinguished himself by the exercise of those personal gifts and qualities which mark the whole of his active career. In 1875 he contested the electorate of Central Cumberland with Messrs. Lackey, Wearne, and A. H. McCulloch. The two former of these three were elected on that occasion to represent the electorate in Parliament. At the general elections in the early part of 1887 Mr. Jeanneret contested another electorate, and was elected to the seat in Parliament, which he still holds as we write this notice of his restlessly progressive career. He is also a magistrate of the territory, and during the time when his services were in active requisition at the Water Police Court his decisions were marked by a strict and intelligent justice and a sound common sense not always found in the records of the work of the unpaid magistracy of the colony. Mr. Jeanneret has at present in view the establishment of a new line of tram communication connecting the fertile Ryde district, Hunter’s Hill, and Sydney together with steam punts across the Paramatta River.

 

 

Extract from ‘Men of Mark 1885’

WYBALENA

 

An address by E. S. Jeanneret to Lodge Wybalena In the early days of the Settlement of Van Diemens Land the Pioneers found a primitive race of people in occupation of the land.

 

Cut off by water from Australia and the rest of the world for thousands of years this primitive race continued the customs of man appertaining to the Stone Age and were ignorant of the development taking place in the rest of the world. Consequently when deprived of their natural foods by the Settlement in what is known as Tasmania, these “primitive folk” had recourse to killing the young stock of the settlers in lieu of the natural food which had been destroyed or driven away. The killing of the stock was resented by the Settlers and the primitive folk were hunted and shot down by the Pioneers until such time as the Government of the day took steps to collect the “remnants of a passing race” and remove them to a peaceful settlement on Flinders Island named Wybalena, where they were cared for and found peace in that “resting place” in their later days.

 

The late Wor. Bro. C. E. Jeanneret, first master of Lodge Hunters Hill, spent part of his boyhood at the Settlement with his father, who was superintendent of the Settlement. The story of the name of the Settlement as told by the Wor. Bro. to his son some fifty years ago is now recounted by him in his father’s words.

 

I see the little Settlement of Wybalena sheltering in a corner of the cove of Flinders Island, where I spent my boyhood days with my father caring for the “remnants of a passing race” the “primitive people” the native race of Van Diemens Land. Pushed aside in the path of progress, hunted and shot down by Free Settlers and liberated convicts alike - now they are removed - now is this passing race of primitive people far removed from the trials and tribulations of their native land to their new found “resting place” Wybalena.

 

 

 

 

As I hold my fishing line and run towards the cove, where fish so plentifully abound, I meet Trucanini --

 

“Ah Trucanini tell me what you mean, what black fellow mean, name Wybalena?”

 

“That, Sir, that name mean - black fellow sit down here - by camp fire.”

Ah, yes, quite so, black fellow sit down here by his camp fire. A primitive language, a primitive people, a primitive life - and so we have the translation in our more civilised customs. “I rest by my fireside”, my resting place, “my home”. And so they pass on - Trucanini and her primitive people pass on, squatting by their camp fire, resting by their fireside. But they have left us a name which shall not be forgotten, for I have named my home, my sons shall name their homes, aye, and peradventure my lodge shall name her daughter Lodge Wybalena.

Trucanini

Wybalena is a large two storey symmetrically planned sandstone house with slate hipped roof. Two wings emanate from a central verandahed tower with cast iron trim. The tower is reached by a centrally located spiral cedar staircase. Wybalena was built by Charles Jeanneret, c 1874-75, as a home for his large family. The house was extended from nine rooms in 1878 to fourteen rooms in 1879. In 1884 the house comprised sixteen rooms with two pavilions and a summer house on 25 acres of land.

 

Jeanneret was responsible for the development of many houses on the southern side of Hunters Hill Peninsula.

 

Wybalena has also functioned as the home of the vice chancellor of the University of Sydney (1967-8?).

 

Other houses built at Hunters Hill by C.E. Jeanneret were: ‘Croissy’, ‘Summerville’ or ‘The Hut’, ‘Yerton’ now ‘The Chalet’, ‘Lyndcote’, ‘Glenrock’, ‘Glencairn’, ‘Willow Banks’ ‘Wingadee’, ‘Wybalena Cottage’, ‘Fernbank’, ‘Meryla’, ‘Lugano’, ‘Norwood’, ‘Brynestone’, ‘Herne’, ‘Gomea’, ‘Henley Cottage’ and two cottages were built on Wybalena estate for employees. Four homes were purchased from the Industrial Exhibition in Paris, 1854.

 

Hunters Hill, now fashionable, understandably became known as the ‘French village’ – a characteristic added to by the arrival of the Marist Fathers further to the west. Much of the building work was done by the many northern Italian (and Swiss Italian) stonemasons brought out by the Jouberts and others, and who built also small stone cottages for themselves.

PARRAMATTA FERRIES by Gregory Blaxell

 

In 1866, Charles Edward Jeanneret became a shareholder in Manning’s company, now called the Parramatta and River Steam Ship Company. Jeanneret became the company’s Manager in 1869. At that time also, there was another ferry company operating on the Parramatta River. It was owned by the Didier and Jules Joubert, well-known residents of Hunters Hill. The two companies merged to form the Parramatta and River Steamers’ Company. In 1875, Jeanneret bought the company from Manning. The Jouberts were left with running the Hunters Hill and Lane Cove Ferry Company.

 

With competition from the railway, the changes in propulsion technology (from paddle wheel to screw propeller) and the silting up of the river beyond Duck River, Jeanneret decided to build a deep-water wharf at Redbank – just west of the present Silverwater Bridge. The Redbank complex offered deep water wharves and Jeanneret proposed to connect these to Parramatta by a steam-driven tramway.

 

The Redbank wharves were more than five kilometres from the centre of Parramatta. His company first gained the approval from the Parramatta Borough Council for this bold plan and in August 1881, the New South Wales Parliament passed the Jeanneret Tramway Act that authorised the construction and maintenance of a tramway from the Domain Gates at Parramatta to Redbank.

 

The Jeanneret tramway was the first private tramway built in New South Wales. The first steam tram ran in October 1884.

 

The Redbank Terminus comprised two wharves, one for passengers and one for freight. There was a station, a waiting shed, and two additional sheds; one for locomotives and passenger cars and the other for goods. Nearby was a crane to handle the freight. The terminus was situated on land leased from the Macarthur family.

 

In 1916, the Municipality of Granville constructed a new road, Grand Avenue, that ran west from near the terminus to Camellia. The tramline ran along Grand Avenue, Grand Avenue North, Noller Avenue and into George Street until it reached the Domain Gates.

 

On the block bordered by Macquarie, O’Connell and George Streets was situated Meggitts Limited who were manufacturers of linseed oil and associated products used as lubricants, as a base for paint and in the manufacture of linoleum. Meggitts used the tramway to transport its products to and from the Redbank wharf.

 

Although there were no ferry passengers from 1928, the tramway continued to operate until 1943. During that time, it carried workers to Hardies, Wunderlich, Goodyear Tyre and Rubber and the Sandown Meatworks and provided a cargo service for Meggitts.

 

Jeanneret sold the company in 1888 to Philip Walker who lost it to the Union Bank.

 

 

 

The new company was called the Sydney and Parramatta Wharves, Steamers and Tramway Company. It was in turn taken over by Sydney Ferries Limited in 1917 and this period is when the ferry services reached their peak. Some of the famous ferries were Bronzewing (1899),Pheasant (1889), Halcyon (1884) and Alaethea (1881). They were larger and propeller-driven with Bronzewing the largest being 110ft (33.5m) in length, displacing 150 tonnes with an operating speed of 12 knots.

 

The Bronzewing was capable of carrying in excess of 500 passengers. The ferries stopped operating form Redbank in 1928.

 

Charles Edward Jeanneret is the gentleman responsible for the building of what we now call the Newport Arms Hotel and the jetty or wharf that allowed passengers on to land in Pittwater. Some sources state a disagreement or a refusal to allow Mr Davis to use this wharf were resolved in Mr Jeanneret purchasing the Florrie. Other sources point to her only ever connecting with other mail steamers from Sydney at the head of Barrenjoey (the custom’s wharf) or with vehicles bringing mail overland into Pittwater. Most of these terminated at Newport due to the condition of the tracks into Pittwater, which were even worse or non-existent further north than this. Either way, Mr Davis seemed happiest building boats while Charles Jeanneret, who must rank among Australia’s pioneers as a gent who invested and built much infrastructure, was a keen ferry procurer.

 

Born in Sydney in 1834 the eldest son of Dr. Henry Jeanneret he grew up on Flinders Island, then a protectorate of Tasmania, where his father had the title of ‘Commandant’ as well as ‘Superintendant of Aborigines’. Here he learnt navigation and seamanship. After stints at sea, sailing to England at 18 and on the goldfields in Bendigo he returned to Sydney in 1850, joined the Bank of New South Wales and married Julia Anne Bellingham in 1857, settling at Hunter’s Hill. They had eight sons and two daughters, the youngest of these, born in 1879 was named Florence Annie. Besides being responsible for the building of many lovely houses at Hunter’s Hill and elsewhere, being attributed with a great avenue of trees in this suburb and the construction, later, of a tramway, C E Jeanneret heard the complaints of fruit growers in this area on the then existing ferry service for their produce down the Parramatta River to Sydney markets.

 

DEATH OF ALDERMAN JEANNERET.

The news that Mr. C. E. Jeanneret had passed away on Tuesday evening was received here with general regret. He had been for many years a prominent man in the public life of the city and this colony. The Evening News of Wednesday publishes the following sketch of his life :-”

 

Charles Edward Jeanneret, who for many years past has taken such an active part in the municipal life of the metropolis, passed away at 9.30 on Tuesday evening, at the age of 64. He died at his son’s farm at Wyrallah, on the Richmond River, after an illness of some months’ duration, which, however, assumed a more serious aspect during the past six weeks. The cause of death was an internal malady of a very painful nature, and the news today that he was no more was received by those of his municipal and business associates who knew him best with the deepest regret.

 

Mr. Jeanneret was a man whose business energy and tact, combined with a naturally genial disposition and a sincere interest in the matters having for their object the advancement of the public welfare, won for him the respect of all with whom he came in contact, either in public or in private life. He was born in Sydney in the year 1834, during the term of rule of Governor Sir Richard Bourke, K.C.B. His father, of whom the deceased gentleman has for many years been the only surviving son, was Dr. Henry Jeanneret, an old colonist, who subsequently became Civil Commandant of Flinders Land, a dependency of Tasmania. Here the son spent most of his boyhood and youth, during which he acquired a love of the sea, and an acquaintance with practical seamanship which led him, at the early age of18 to take a voyage to Europe. On his return to Australia, he abandoned the sea for the more alluring temptations of the gold rushes, and he put in some years upon the Bendigo fields and at Sandhurst.

 

Subsequently he returned to Sydney, and after a period of service in the Bank of New South, Wales, he entered into a general agency partnership with Mr. Henry Porter. About this time he married, and settled at Hunter’s Hill, on the Lane Cove River. The district at that time was little better than a tract of wild bush, the few residences which had been erected being very far  apart.

 

Mr. Jeanneret made some prudent investments in land, with the profits from which he became a shareholder in and afterwards manager of the local steam ferry company. After a keen competition with a rival ferry for some years, the two coalesced, and Mr. Jeanneret became proprietor of the concern in1870, his fleet numbering five steamers, a number which he afterwards increased to about twenty. Farming, mining, and meat preserving occupied his time, and the traces of his building enterprise are visible all along the banks of the Lane Cove and Parramatta River.

 

One of his works is the tramway from the Parramatta River to the Park. The incorporation of Hunter’s Hill, of which he was afterwards several times Mayor, was due almost entirely to his advocacy and personal exertions, and he has been an alderman since that event which occurred in 1871. In the City Council he has represented. Bourke Ward for many years with Sir William Manning and Mr. Alexander Down. At the general election in the early part of 1887 he was returned to the Legislative Assembly, where he sat for some years as the representative of Carcoar. Mr. Jeanneret was an Hon. Magistrate of the colony at the time when his services were often in active requisition at the Water Police Court, and his decisions are stated to have always been marked by an intelligent justice and a sound common-sense.

 

The deceased gentleman was removed to his sons’ place on Monday. He was brought down from his residence at Hunter’s Hill by the Civil Ambulance and Transport Brigade, and conveyed to the N.C.S. Company’s steamer Electra by which he journeyed north. Deceased, we may add, leaves a widow, six: sons, and two daughters. Knowing the hopelessness of recovering from his ailment, and the certainty of early death, he was quite resigned, and so came to Wyrallah to die surrounded by his family. His remains, by his own request, were enclosed in a leaden coffin to be sent to Sydney for interment in the family vault at Ryde. A short service was held at his late residence, Wyrallah, yesterday, Canon. Ewing conducting the same, and the coffin was then placed on Board the Electra. The interment will take place at Ryde on Monday.